Greenhouses: More Than Just Functional

Some of the most popular articles that I’ve written on this website have been about my inexpensive greenhouses. From my Giant 24′x48′ A-Frame to my hail-proof PVC hoop-style greenhouse, I’ve explored all kinds of options for how to keep my garden safe from the harsh Alberta climate. And while most of my ideas are functional solutions – I can’t say they are always beautiful solutions. Rough cut lumber covered by a plastic sheet does keep the tomatoes from freezing, but it may not enhance the overall look of your yard. And in many cases, that’s ok. A hoop-frame greenhouse out behind the barn on the farm fits in nicely, but it might look out of place in your beautifully landscaped city yard.

So if you’re looking for a more attractive way to extend your growing season, you may want to consider a Victorian greenhouse. These beautiful glass structures are not only functional, but they also add character to your garden and value to your home. When I was making the landscaping plan for my backyard, this is type of greenhouse that I designed for.

Search through several Grow Lights and other necessities for your greenhouse all at an affordable price!

Ideally, I’d like a fully heated, cedar-frame glass greenhouse – about 12′ x 30′. (My current hoop-frame is 12′ x 20′.) It would be great to start my own annuals out there (instead of in my basement like I currently do). And it would be nice to have my greenhouse as a key feature of my garden, rather than something to be hidden in the back corner.    Of course, I’ve been doing my landscaping in phases, (doing small projects as the budget allows) and so that type of greenhouse is still a few years away – but that’s the goal.

Until then I’ll be happy to keep on growing in my inexpensive hoop-style greenhouse and be just slightly envious of those of you who enjoy your beautiful glass greenhouses.

Are you one of the lucky people to have a Victorian greenhouse? I’d love to see your pictures! Feel free to attach them to your comments below!

 

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7 Responses to Greenhouses: More Than Just Functional

  1. mike says:

    My greenhouse is only 10×6 due to lack of space but I still spend hours in there during the spring, summer and autumn, interesting how you protect your tomatoes from frost.

  2. dayna says:

    Hi. I just bought a property which has a greenhouse. (Hoop style with plastic.)
    The property was vacant for some time and the greenhouse is unfunctional.
    I’m wondering how to get it back on track. What is the best way to regulate heat and moisture? The plastic has held up fine, the weeds grow wonderfully during the non winter months. In the mid spring-summer, it’s so hot, any attempts at starting seedlings last year resulted in melted pots and wasted seeds.
    help!

  3. Crystal says:

    I love your ideas to help enhance our Alberta home life. :) We love gardening and hope to have a greenhouse up this spring. Thanks for all of your wonderful ideas!

  4. Clayton says:

    I have nominated you for a Versatile Blogger Award. Drop by my blog for details.

  5. Mother says:

    I was searching when I could put up my new greenhouse and came across your blog. It’s great to read about a gardener’s efforts so close to home. When do you start putting plants (or seedlings) out in your unheated(?)greenhouse?

    • Dave says:

      Mother: In looking back at my records for the last three years, I’ve been transplanting into my unheated greenhouse on May 27, May 29, and Jun 10. But it really depends on the weather. My general rule of thumb is I look at the 15 day forecast, and if there is no frost forecasted for the next two weeks, then I can transplant into the greenhouse. But of course, if you throw even a small space heater in there, you can get away with a few nights of minus degree weather.

  6. Benoit Roussel says:

    You can put under your greenhouse plastic, transparent bubles plastic,then you will be able to get more cold outside and your heating would be lot more effective.You would be able to start lot more earlier.I use it for my mouving green houses tires superior to my green house for sensible vagetables.For earliness to seed by bunch like turnup,carotes cabages,ect..For spring superior hardyness i use transparent plastic wine cup and a bit later i use transparent plastic glass.I work them to protect and water by hand on top,when ground get frozen or by rain.No transplant nessary and transplants possible for sensibles. Only the east side of my home give me lot more time on fall for my green house.Zone 2b

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